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LP Classic/1960 Reissue myth?

Zentar

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The Cherrybust Classic is a truly gorgeous plaintop that comes with 57 Classic humbuckers. I wouldn't call it a beginner LP. It is front line weaponry.

Classics, Traditionals, Standards, Reissues, Historics, and Customs are all big time LPs.
 

Tom Wittrock

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The Cherrybust Classic is a truly gorgeous plaintop that comes with 57 Classic humbuckers. I wouldn't call it a beginner LP. It is front line weaponry.

Classics, Traditionals, Standards, Reissues, Historics, and Customs are all big time LPs.

So, if you are a full time touring and recording guitarist who has never owned a Gibson Les Paul, a nice Les Paul Classic would make a great entry level Les Paul. :ganz


:salude
 

Zentar

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So, if you are a full time touring and recording guitarist who has never owned a Gibson Les Paul, a nice Les Paul Classic would make a great entry level Les Paul. :ganz


:salude

Why do you call it entry level? A Classic is not a Studio by any measure. Classics are nearly $2000. Most guitarists never own a $2000 guitar.
 

Shakey

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Back in 2009 as my memory serves the lineup of lp's was very different and the classic was towards the lower end, that and there weren't as many guitars in the line. I'm pretty sure the modern classic sits in a different place price point wise. I remember back in around 09 you could pick up classics for a round £999 and a standard was about £1400 and studio's where around £600-800. I've always though studio's from the era where pretty hit and miss (more often a miss than hit!) so that being said I'd say that in 2009 a classic would be the best entry level Gibson les paul!
 

Tim

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The Cherrybust Classic is a truly gorgeous plaintop that comes with 57 Classic humbuckers. I wouldn't call it a beginner LP. It is front line weaponry.

Classics, Traditionals, Standards, Reissues, Historics, and Customs are all big time LPs.

Which model do you consider to be a beginner LP?
 

Zentar

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Which model do you consider to be a beginner LP?

Melody Maker, Studios.
I wouldn't call Juniors or Specials entry level because they have extensive history of being used by the best on the biggest songs. They are amazing guitars not starter models. They outgrew their original entry level intentions
 

Triplet

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I bought a Classic for my son a few years back. Only short comings are the stock ceramic Pups and short tenon. Replaced the pups and did the Mapleflame mod for the ABR to compensate for the short tenon - GOLDEN :salude
 

Big Al

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Melody Maker, Studios.
I wouldn't call Juniors or Specials entry level because they have extensive history of being used by the best on the biggest songs. They are amazing guitars not starter models. They outgrew their original entry level intentions

Entry level is about availability and cost and has nothing to do with some perceived greatness or lack of. Easier to get = entry for most. BTW a humble Melody Maker from late 50's - mid 60's is every bit as good a guitar, and in the case of the D Models originally more expensive than a Jr, as a Jr or Special. They were made to allow for a lower price point and a greater accessibility for first time byers, you know, entry level. Tom's point is the only point that is germane in this thread. Any first guitar is by definition an Entry Level Guitar.

My experience, at least with the classic era Gibson Guitars, is that all Gibsons are quality guitars and built well within the the constants of price point. Just like today, I feel that the lower tier Solid Body guitars like Tributes and Studios are very well made and can function as top tier professional guitars when called on to do so, yet are affordable to those of us who are on tighter budgets.

I bought my son a two color burst Melody Maker brand new for $300 awhile back, (I wish they still made those), it is such a cool playing and sounding guitar. Mahogany body and neck, rosewood fingerboard and we replaced the stock single coil, (which sounded pretty darn good), with a Duncan JB Jr and put in a coil cut mini switch. That guitar rocks!!! $300!!!!!!! Brand new Gibson for $300!!!! I would buy another in an instant if I find one.

So Entry level does't mean cheap, it means less expensive, or more within the grasp of those with less dough. It doesn't mean badly built or made by some crappy offshore, outsourced cheap labor, lousy quality factory. They are built in the USA by the same peeps that build the $$$$$ stuff. It doesn't mean crappy components, it means less bling. Maybe no gold plating, or satin finish instead of rubbed out polished gloss, it means perhaps no binding. I think, in the case of the lower tier stuff it is BRASS TACKS. Just the stuff you need. No fluff.

And as Tom said, whatever is your first, is your entry level.
 

Zentar

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It's probably better to take all Gibson's off the entry level list.
 

Mats A

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It's about the meaning you read in the phrase entry level guitar. To me it means a cheaper made but that doesn't mean it can't be a great guitar. So if you buy a '59 Burst as your first guitar it would mean that is a good entry level Les Paul! Sometimes i think some sit on their high horses and treat others like they were stupid. It should be a nice freandly forum for guitar geeks.
 

clearmudd

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It's about the meaning you read in the phrase entry level guitar. To me it means a cheaper made but that doesn't mean it can't be a great guitar. So if you buy a '59 Burst as your first guitar it would mean that is a good entry level Les Paul! Sometimes i think some sit on their high horses and treat others like they were stupid. It should be a nice freandly forum for guitar geeks.
Sounds like someone has a stoned pony.
 

dcdefend

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Aug 9, 2007
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I like the thin necks of the Classics due to my hand size. I purchased a 93 Classic goldtop first. It was nice and light, but I couldn't stand the pickups. They were replaced with 57 Classics pretty quickly. Since then I have sent this guitar to Historic Makeovers, changed the pickups to Wagner Fillmores and replaced the bridge (ABR-1 no wire) and stopbar with nickel, replaced the turners with Kluson double ring/single line ones, changed the knobs to tophats with silver tops, and changed the electronics to vintage style pots and caps. Yes, I could have probably bought an R7 for about the same money, but I like this one's neck and weight.

I also acquired a 1993 Premium Plus Classic. It's a little heavier, but a beautiful flamed top. It too has gone to Historic Makeovers. Since then the finish has checked beautifully. It has Wagner Darkburst/Godwood pickups (These had come in an R0, which I replaced with OX4s.) All the hardware, electronics and plastics have been replaced as with the Goldtop.

I don't know much about the newer Classics, but I think these early ones are fine guitars.

John
 

Big Al

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I like the thin necks of the Classics due to my hand size. I purchased a 93 Classic goldtop first. It was nice and light, but I couldn't stand the pickups. They were replaced with 57 Classics pretty quickly. Since then I have sent this guitar to Historic Makeovers, changed the pickups to Wagner Fillmores and replaced the bridge (ABR-1 no wire) and stopbar with nickel, replaced the turners with Kluson double ring/single line ones, changed the knobs to tophats with silver tops, and changed the electronics to vintage style pots and caps. Yes, I could have probably bought an R7 for about the same money, but I like this one's neck and weight.

I also acquired a 1993 Premium Plus Classic. It's a little heavier, but a beautiful flamed top. It too has gone to Historic Makeovers. Since then the finish has checked beautifully. It has Wagner Darkburst/Godwood pickups (These had come in an R0, which I replaced with OX4s.) All the hardware, electronics and plastics have been replaced as with the Goldtop.

I don't know much about the newer Classics, but I think these early ones are fine guitars.

John

Sounds like you did what you needed to have the guitars you love. Sounds pretty smart to me. I gotta say though, from my perspective, "the finish has checked beautifully" is a phrase I find funny.:rofl It's great that you have the guitars that please you or suit you best.
 

snag

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Jan 1, 2010
Messages
253
Bought a 2006 Cherry Sunburst (clown burst) classic in 2009. Loved everything about that guitar, which wasn't my first LP nor my last. I enjoyed the hot pickups and aggressive response they offered. I now associated the looks of the snot green inlays to the sound of that snarling, snapping whip attack. Sold it to a bandmate who I thought would keep it for some time, but he in turn sold it within a month. I really miss that guitar!
 
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