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'Mapleflame Mod" - I HATE MYSELF!!!

djangolad

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Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
582
:doh

Brass was the wrong choice in the first place! They're meant to be stainless steel!
 

lonesomesheik

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Nov 18, 2009
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1,217
All the folks from the land of Wine & Cheese compatissent!!! (I've had some problems with a broken head and a not so good self proclaimed "luthier"!):rolleyes:
 

Coda

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Aug 17, 2010
Messages
115
DSCF2128.jpg


For next time; I used a 6-32 tap for the 2" brass post mod. My local hardware shop (UK) was able to order up the tap. The tap was made in Japan and the part numbers on the box were LT ISO02283, and 1099476990. Hope this helps.
 

DHBucker

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Joined
Jul 18, 2007
Messages
2,367
Best of luck winered. My heart sank when I read this thread. It pains me to think of something like this. Just take your time and like my dad always said about this kinda stuff, "measure twice, cut once." I hate it when you are careful, going slowing, and the bullshit still drops.....Just doesn't seem fair. Takes a bit to get over but you'll get there.
 

wild.joz

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Joined
Mar 19, 2008
Messages
1,933
Well, just came back from my friend who has the press drill. I'm totally fucked!
No way we could center the drill bit correctly, it was constantly slipping towards the wood on the side. I'm totally disgusted, frustrated and with a stupid guilty feeling!!!

I'm good for sending it to. A luthier to drill and re-plug the abr post hole for a new fresh drilling.
I know it will be barely noticeable in the end, and probably the sound will still be as good or maybe better, but man, do I feel like jumping off a bridge (no pun intended) now?!

Anyway, lesson learned. I'll probably never again try to fix something that ain't broken, and leave things how they were meant to be. It bugs me big time because I'm quite handy and DIYer, but this time, major fuckup on an expansive toy !
 

Gold Tone

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Apr 2, 2002
Messages
6,822
If you're going to drill and replug, no harm in trying what I suggested...it worked perfectly in my situation on a much smaller screw.

If you're plugging anyway...
 

J.D.

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May 24, 2006
Messages
9,780
Uugh. Sucks. I personally do not like this mod. IMO a properly seated stud of the standard length is more than adequate to accomplish its intended function. YMMV, yadda, yadda :wah
 

wild.joz

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Mar 19, 2008
Messages
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If you're going to drill and replug, no harm in trying what I suggested...it worked perfectly in my situation on a much smaller screw.

If you're plugging anyway...

Not possible anymore. The remains of the post are below the surface...
 

Coda

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Aug 17, 2010
Messages
115
If you can, look up a Dan Erlewine Tech article in Vintage Guitar August 2008, page 108. It has pictures. Has advice for removing a broken off pick-up ring mounting screw in a Les Paul;

... I removed the broken screw by making a "plug cutter/puller" from thin-walled, hollow brass tubing chucked into an electric hand drill.

....I sharpened the the tubing so it tapered to a thin end...I used a sharp edged diamond file to to make two teeth that would help remove wood from around the screw.

I positioned the tubing around the screw so it drilled down around the screw. Once the tubing was started, the screw shank served as a guide and kept it centred. The brass tubing fitted over the screw with a little room to spare.

After drilling I stopped and reversed the drill and the screw came with it.

The hole was then filled with a glued in wood plug and then re-drilled for the replacement new screw.

---

Note that this procedure was for a small pick-up screw. But I think it should work okay for the bridge stud. Good luck !
 

DANELECTRO

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Joined
Feb 24, 2003
Messages
6,219
If it makes you feel any better, look what my dumb ass did last year.

The victim; a 1955 Junior with short bushings and a typical case of post lean.
GibsonLesPaul55Junior510116004800.jpg


I have a tool that I made for pulling the bushings and I've done it several times before without any problems. I straightened the bushing within the hole and carefully cut away the lacquer that was overlapping the top of the bushing. Using my tool I started slowly jacking the bushing out of the hole when all of the sudden, "crack" and a chip of wood pops off. Apparently, the bushing must have tilted a bit and it caught on the edge of the wood and lifted away a 1/32" thick flake of wood/lacquer. You talk about the cuss words flying! :##
GibsonLesPaul55Junior510116016800.jpg


I glued the chip back on and took it to a local luthier who can fix pretty much anything. He said he didn't feel he could conceal it well enough that I would be happy with the results and he declined to take on the job.

GibsonLesPaul55Junior510116024800.jpg


I did a little touch up myself to hide the exposed wood around the perimeter of the chip, but it still looks like shit and I'm reminded of what an idiot I am every time I pick up the guitar. I'll probably revisit trying to conceal the damage but for now I'm just going to leave it alone.
GibsonLesPaul52Goldtop003800.jpg


On a brighter note, the posts don't lean and are solid as a rock.
 
Last edited:

dvdobson

New member
Joined
Sep 29, 2002
Messages
36
I had the exact same experience, attempting to replace the screws with longer brass ones. Mine snapped off just barely above the top of the guitar. I did the smart thing - took it to the talented repair guys at Dave's Guitar Shop. What they did was to get out some old fret nippers that were dull and turn them into pliers that could get really close to the top. There was just enough screw to get a grip on, and they got it far enough out to where a regular pliers could be safely used. I can't say I'll never do it again because I took it back home and put the long brass screw in after drilling the hole out a little more. I think the longer screws do make a difference.

I've done a bunch of guitars with the stainless steel screws, but I used brass in this case because the hardware is gold. Anyone know if you can get stainless screws with gold plating? I think that might be a better option in the future.
 

pinefd

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Joined
Jan 22, 2004
Messages
3,043
If you can, look up a Dan Erlewine Tech article in Vintage Guitar August 2008, page 108. It has pictures. Has advice for removing a broken off pick-up ring mounting screw in a Les Paul;

... I removed the broken screw by making a "plug cutter/puller" from thin-walled, hollow brass tubing chucked into an electric hand drill.

....I sharpened the the tubing so it tapered to a thin end...I used a sharp edged diamond file to to make two teeth that would help remove wood from around the screw.

I positioned the tubing around the screw so it drilled down around the screw. Once the tubing was started, the screw shank served as a guide and kept it centred. The brass tubing fitted over the screw with a little room to spare.

After drilling I stopped and reversed the drill and the screw came with it.

The hole was then filled with a glued in wood plug and then re-drilled for the replacement new screw.

---

Note that this procedure was for a small pick-up screw. But I think it should work okay for the bridge stud. Good luck !


This is exactly what a couple of us recommended earlier in this thread. I've done it, and it works.

Hey, winered, I'll check in the next day or two and see if I have any tubing that would fit these posts. If so, I'll make you one of these little post saws/plug cutters. And I may be able to make a plug that's the correct size too. I'll keep you posted. But if you don't hear back from me in the next couple of days, feel free to email me at: pinefd@comcast.net


Frank
 

wild.joz

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Mar 19, 2008
Messages
1,933
This is exactly what a couple of us recommended earlier in this thread. I've done it, and it works.

Hey, winered, I'll check in the next day or two and see if I have any tubing that would fit these posts. If so, I'll make you one of these little post saws/plug cutters. And I may be able to make a plug that's the correct size too. I'll keep you posted. But if you don't hear back from me in the next couple of days, feel free to email me at: pinefd@comcast.net


Frank

Frank, I don't know what to say. This is SO generous. I will be very happy and grateful if you can do it. I will email you shortly.
Once again, thank you all for taking the time to read and reply with your ideas, comments and suggestions.
 

sharky

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Jan 25, 2012
Messages
1,267
Well, just came back from my friend who has the press drill. I'm totally fucked!
No way we could center the drill bit correctly, it was constantly slipping towards the wood on the side.

did you plane the top surface of the post with maybe a router prior to the drilling process? After this, the center of the flat surface can easily be found out by using a magnifier. Than punch a hole with a center punch which allows the drill bit to stay in the center without wandering to the sides. Starting with the smallest of diameters should work then.

But this is all basic knowledge the metal guy should know. If he didn't, he is the wrong man for this kind of job
 

wild.joz

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Joined
Mar 19, 2008
Messages
1,933
did you plane the top surface of the post with maybe a router prior to the drilling process? After this, the center of the flat surface can easily be found out by using a magnifier. Than punch a hole with a center punch which allows the drill bit to stay in the center without wandering to the sides. Starting with the smallest of diameters should work then.

But this is all basic knowledge the metal guy should know. If he didn't, he is the wrong man for this kind of job

Sharky, yes we did all that. But once you're there, with the stress, sweat, and whatnot, it makes things 100x more difficult to do...! Besides, drilling brass is totally different than drilling aluminium, steel etc... That shit just disintegrates even using brand new bits!
 

capitalbear

Active member
Joined
May 17, 2011
Messages
1,048
This is exactly what a couple of us recommended earlier in this thread. I've done it, and it works.

Hey, winered, I'll check in the next day or two and see if I have any tubing that would fit these posts. If so, I'll make you one of these little post saws/plug cutters. And I may be able to make a plug that's the correct size too. I'll keep you posted. But if you don't hear back from me in the next couple of days, feel free to email me at: pinefd@comcast.net


Frank

I did that once, using the shaft of a standard 1/4" mono jack plug. Cutting off the tip by the isolator ring gives you a small diameter, thin walled tube, easy to cut theeth in. IMO the only way to get that remains of the thread out of the guitar. The "damage" is in control, predictable and easy to dowel after the operation.
 
K

Kim R

Guest
For what it's worth:

I've had complete success with several of these repairs by letting a local machinist use his very large platform press. If you have such a shop around, I think you'll find that their ability to drill/remove metal is far superior to what above-average guitar techs have at their disposal. So far - never had to dowel or otherwise repair the wood at all.

Good luck~
 
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