• Guys, we've spent considerable money converting the Les Paul Forum to this new XenForo platform, and we have ongoing monthly operating expenses. THE "DONATIONS" TAB IS NOW WORKING, AND WE WOULD APPRECIATE ANY DONATIONS YOU CAN MAKE TO KEEP THE LES PAUL FORUM GOING! Thank you!

"Unplugged Natural Compression"...

Wedge

New member
Joined
Feb 28, 2015
Messages
11
I told him I would make him famous... I'm going to start using "Unplugged natural compression" whenever I talk about this guitar. Ya'all feel free to do the same! Who knows, maybe someday it will get back to him...
 

Johnny Bom Bonny

New member
Joined
Feb 26, 2020
Messages
8
This is not to stir up trouble, and I do not condone any nastiness on the part of the customer in question, who may or may not know what he is talking about, but my personal observation is that some Les Paul guitars sound more dynamic than others. This is usually related to the initial attack of the note, and its decay. Others on this forum have made similar observations in the past, regarding "compressed" sound, relating to the acoustical quality of the instrument:


Guitar makers sometimes mention compression in relation to the woods used in the construction of a guitar:

"Khaya Mahogany is a hard, bright sounding wood with a tendency to accentuate the mid-range. With its large dynamic range, it responds very well to players with a strong attack who like dry, earthy, low-fi sounds; natural compression creates a volume ceiling that smoothes out loose righthand technique. The clean and direct tonal character makes it a great option for playing with other instruments."

"Sometimes we use hardwoods such as mahogany or koa as guitar tops. These denser materials require more energy to set in motion, and the vibration tends to move more gradually through them. The result is a kind of natural compression effect that rounds out the guitar’s initial attack, producing a focused voice with fewer overtones."
 

Wedge

New member
Joined
Feb 28, 2015
Messages
11
This is not to stir up trouble, and I do not condone any nastiness on the part of the customer in question, who may or may not know what he is talking about, but my personal observation is that some Les Paul guitars sound more dynamic than others. This is usually related to the initial attack of the note, and its decay. Others on this forum have made similar observations in the past, regarding "compressed" sound, relating to the acoustical quality of the instrument:


Guitar makers sometimes mention compression in relation to the woods used in the construction of a guitar:

"Khaya Mahogany is a hard, bright sounding wood with a tendency to accentuate the mid-range. With its large dynamic range, it responds very well to players with a strong attack who like dry, earthy, low-fi sounds; natural compression creates a volume ceiling that smoothes out loose righthand technique. The clean and direct tonal character makes it a great option for playing with other instruments."

"Sometimes we use hardwoods such as mahogany or koa as guitar tops. These denser materials require more energy to set in motion, and the vibration tends to move more gradually through them. The result is a kind of natural compression effect that rounds out the guitar’s initial attack, producing a focused voice with fewer overtones."
You know that does make sense. Its true that all woods have different, even stronger tones. My 54 Esquire sounds different that my 59 Strat, same Ash body and maple necks. One day I swapped necks to see if it changed the tone of the guitar, and it did. A vintage reissue Paul definitely sounds different from a chambered Paul. That said I am going to stop dissing the guy. I was being an asshole, and retaliating because he wasted my time. I am not acting my age, and kind of embarrassed now. So... I'm done! And if this post disappears, it will not be because of any of your responses, you all have been kind. I just feel like its time to give it up, and now its time to just play that guitar... loudly.
 
Top