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Working with Nylon 6/6

MeHereNow

Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
677
On my 68 RI custom i want to install a nylon 6/6 nut to replace the factory corian one.
I'm making it myself and wondered if there are forummembers here who have experience in working with this material.
Are there any specific things to consider seeing nylon is quite different material to work with than bone, tusq, corian etc?
Mostly the final sanding and polishing, what to use?
Thnx in advance! :salude
 

deytookerjaabs

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 6, 2016
Messages
1,458
I've only made two from scratch and that's why I've only made two :laugh2:



It wasn't that bad though, but I don't know any secret tricks that others might have??

I tried it the traditional way and it was just a long time spent sanding/filing but the results were great...it's not that it's just low on friction, it's low on friction with old strings and slightly imperfect slots etc, dummy proof.


Does Gibson sell the pre-formed stuff? I'd start there.
 

RandK

Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
119
Not fun material to work with by hand...

Use saws whenever possible to trim the blank to size rather than metal files which don't bite well. Belt sander will make a melted mess.
Use abrasive files, I like 3m gold stick-it like you use for fretwork, stuck to a wood paddle or flat surface for shaping.
Use gauged saws, Stewmac or X-acto eq hobby saw to cut your starter string slots. Follow up to size with regular nut files working up from small to size as needed.
Treat it like finish to get a shine. Remove scratches etc 220/320/400/600/800/1200/1500/2000. Buff with nonabrasive white nylon pad or felt block. No dremel

It's important for good tone and proper fit to get the front and back faces parallel and the bottom flat and perpendicular to the sides.

Might want to get some extras just in case you need to start over...
 
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Reactions: Sol

korus

Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2003
Messages
635
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Slotted-ny...ul-Guitars-original-50s-spacing-/323113989909
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Slotted-ny...aul-Guitars-compensated-spacing-/323006134385

and for Gibson Custom Shop guitars

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Slotted-ny...storic-Reissue-Les-Paul-Guitars-/323006068328

I have used different blanks before these, but now I will use these only. My friend luthier prefers these - less time to fit them. I prefer these - slightly harder and tone more to my liking. And my guitars are left-handed, so nuts for me were CNC cut as left-handed. This is 21st century, after all, hence the solution. I have them on all my guitars now. And any new one with back angled headstock will get one of these for sure.

I did not have a chance to compare them to original Nylon nut on old guitar, maybe some other members did.

Highest recommendation, indeed. Tone is spot on, the design saves time and money.

HTH

edit: I just saw blanks also https://www.ebay.com/itm/CNC-shaped...Custom-Les-Paul-guitars-set-of-3/323012644695.
 

Yelly

Active member
Joined
Aug 29, 2001
Messages
1,532
If you do make from scratch cut as close to size as you can. Sanding to thickness takes forever. Avoid any power tools, as previously stated, melting is all too easy.
If you can get a CNC blank go for it.
 

geetarpicker

Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2003
Messages
812
I too had a great experience using the CNC cut nylon blanks sold on eBay. That said I had to trim mine a little however I used several grades of sand paper, then finished the job with a set of Micromesh pads. The Micromesh pads work their way up to such fine grit that the nylon looks nicely polished.
 

BrandonDyer

New member
Joined
Aug 31, 2020
Messages
1
I was always kind of afraid of doing any work on my guitar because I was afraid of ruining it. I would always find someone to do the work for me until corona happened and only person who could do it was me. I got a sander from Amazon and before that I was checking out the best ones for 2020 on this site. It was not that easy to choose one, but I went for ROS20VSC bosch sander and I think that it was a good choice. Now I am trying it out on some wood, before I do any work on the actual guitar. It does not seem to be that hard.
 
Last edited:

Thatcher

New member
Joined
Jan 8, 2021
Messages
13
I have never worked with such fragile material as nylon before, it breaks very easily. what is related to polishing, I would advise you to use the orbital sander, it is a little more expensive than the palm sander, but I think that for such a clean job you need a good machine. I personally took it on https://www.bestorbitalsander.com/, this sander has a speed reaches 12,000 rpm. What about the nozzle I can recommend 125 mm 8-hole paper Mestool P-58, gold Velcro sandpaper. Don't worry about dust - these machines have a Dust collection.
 

Sol

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2001
Messages
548
Not fun material to work with by hand...

Use saws whenever possible to trim the blank to size rather than metal files which don't bite well. Belt sander will make a melted mess.
Use abrasive files, I like 3m gold stick-it like you use for fretwork, stuck to a wood paddle or flat surface for shaping.
Use gauged saws, Stewmac or X-acto eq hobby saw to cut your starter string slots. Follow up to size with regular nut files working up from small to size as needed.
Treat it like finish to get a shine. Remove scratches etc 220/320/400/600/800/1200/1500/2000. Buff with nonabrasive white nylon pad or felt block. No dremel

It's important for good tone and proper fit to get the front and back faces parallel and the bottom flat and perpendicular to the sides.

Might want to get some extras just in case you need to start over...
This is really good advice
 
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