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I want to become a guitar repair tech. Where do I start?

DutchRay

Active member
Joined
Mar 15, 2015
Messages
354
Experience is key.
Buy a cheap guitar and take it apart and put it back together. Some books about tech work might be useful and the StewMac youtube channel is also very useful.
It also helps if you have some guitar playing friends and ask them for feedback on your work.
 

Mattyboy75

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2020
Messages
79
It’s a bit of a vague question.
You don’t mention how much you already know or do you mean you are already doing repairs and want to know how to turn it into a career?
if the former then understanding wiring, schematics, components and what resistor values will do the tone etc.
how to perform mods such as the Jimmy page or Peter green mods, how and why they sound like that.
knowing why a guitar isn’t making any sound.
its not enough just to be able to fix a broken wire.
if the later then asking around your local shops.
good luck either way.
 

Sol

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2001
Messages
724
Books, read lots of books.
I recommend the 'Guitar Players Repair Guide', this is a good place to start.
 
Last edited:

Jayden1990

New member
Joined
Sep 5, 2021
Messages
5
To become a guitar repair technician, you need to know anything familiar with guitars. In addition to being able to play the instrument, you must have the knowledge to repair and rebuild both electric and acoustic guitars as well as restring and tune them. Most employers have to pass and get at least a high school diploma or equivalent, but completing a certificate or associate degree program in guitar technology, instrument construction, or instrument repair is a great way to enhance your knowledge and skills. You can find guitar repair technician jobs
  1. at instrument manufacturing plants
  2. music shops
  3. instrument repair shops
  4. with touring musicians.
 
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Sol

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2001
Messages
724
The art, or trade craft of repairing stringed musical instruments is one of the most demanding and exacting disciplines in music instrument care.
However this can be a very rewarding trade to those prepared to put in the time and work.

A common misunderstanding is that a Luthier can repair structural damage to almost any stringed instrument, but the truth is that the knowledge of how to build a guitar requires a different skill set to that of someone that can repair that guitar should it be damaged, flat and archtop guitars come to mind here for example.

Building and repairing are two different but connected disciplines , and while there is some 'crossover' between the two in the hands of the very gifted, mere mortals are limited to one or the other, at least for this lifetime.. The key to all this is your passion and love for music and the instruments that bring it all to life..
 
Last edited:

Sol

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2001
Messages
724
To become a guitar repair technician, you need to know anything familiar with guitars. In addition to being able to play the instrument, you must have the knowledge to repair and rebuild both electric and acoustic guitars as well as restring and tune them. Most employers have to pass and get at least a high school diploma or equivalent, but completing a certificate or associate degree program in guitar technology, instrument construction, or instrument repair is a great way to enhance your knowledge and skills. You can find guitar repair technician jobs
  1. at instrument manufacturing plants
  2. music shops
  3. instrument repair shops
  4. with touring musicians.
A great first post. Welcome to the LPF !
 

agogetr

Active member
Joined
Jan 22, 2019
Messages
451
you should start on anyones guitar but mine...i just had to say that lol
these guys have good advise, i think stew mac sells a book. also get a handfull of cheapo guitars and start tweaking them, necks, wiring, set up a simple spray booth and start playing with paint, keep in mind a good paint store can computer match colors these days that i feel would be a big help. a good luthier/tech is worth his weight in gold to musicians. my pal has built a steady clientelle. and the silver ligning is that techs get the inside track on a lot of vintage guitars from clients. i cant believe how much stuff he has turned my way over the years. now he says he is making more flipping clients guitars!
 
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