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Music production experts?

guitartsar

Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
77
I produce music for a living and have a complex set up for work but you can make great music with a good laptop (my pref would be a Mac) and Logic Pro. Logic Pro comes with a lot of plug ins, sounds and effects and is pretty easy to learn and is not that expensive for what you get.
 

MadeleineGlover

New member
Joined
Apr 21, 2021
Messages
1
Producing music was too hard for me, but I always found it fascinating.
I found royalty free background music on the Depositphotos website. These background sound effects have made the songs I've made sound much better.
I have played versions of the same songs with and without these sound effects to my friends, and all of them like the songs with the background music.
It's great when you find something like this online, and it's free to use. Most of the music today is copyrighted, and you can't just use whatever you want. Finding something as good as this is rare. Why not use it...
 
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Amp360

Active member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
234
Recently I have developed a new passion for music creation but I have no idea what to do and where to start. So, I am here looking for some advice on what software should I go for as a newbie. I watched some youtube videos on this subject and they were suggesting softwares like Audacity, Logic pro X, garageband, FL studio, walk band, etc.


I am not sure which of these software would be an ideal choice for a beginner.


Any suggestions?
Well, I'm not an expert but I have a degree from Berklee in MP&E and also worked on (at the time) the best selling Music Technology training series for DAWs for a few years and have been working in studios for 20+ years (and own a studio).

My advice would be to take a really good class (I'm biased but I would suggest Berklee Online). It will cost you about $1000 but honestly you'll avoid a lot of frustration, won't have to rely on "internet experts" giving you half truths or things they read and are repeating and will have classmates and an instructor who will be there to help you get a solid foundation.

Plus, you can get a really good discount on your software which would really offset the class. I know they get you very substantial discounts on software like Logic, Live and ProTools as well as hardware, plugins, etc....

You'll get a solid foundation and will be able to transfer those skills to any DAW if you learn the right way from the beginning.
 

Bob Womack

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2002
Messages
1,954
If you ever want to play with the big boys, you've got to know Protools
Mmmm... I've been on Nuendo professionally for nearly twenty years (before that on analog 24-track for twenty years), doing everything from Audio Post for Film and Video to scoring to albums. Many of the scoring composers I work with are moving AWAY from Pro Tools because the GUIs on some of the others are better for their application. Yes, PT is the leading platform in recording studios scoring stages. But I've been in it long enough that I remember when pros wouldn't mix within the box in Pro Tools because they hadn't solved fundamental latency issues and the mixes would fold up towards the center. At the same time and from the start, Nuendo engineered latency compensation into their product.

Bob
 

Amp360

Active member
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
Messages
234
I used Nuendo for a while, even had the Houston, which was a pretty cool control surface, on PC with an RME 9652. It was a great setup but since I was using ProTools in the office I wanted to have everything closer. Each of the major DAWs have their plusses and minuses and I've found that now that I'm always getting files from other people using PT makes sense. If that weren't the case maybe I would be using something else, but probably not.

I do have a copy of Logic that I need to authorize. It doesn't run on the Avid hardware so I'm not sure when I'll get to it but I would like to check it out sometime as I hear great things.
 

Wilko

All Access/Backstage Pass
Joined
Mar 11, 2002
Messages
19,867
Learn production first. Software is just the tool. What you need to know is across all software.hardware solutions. Mic technology, engineering basics, etc.
 

Ed Driscoll

Les Paul Forum Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2002
Messages
4,589
Learn production first. Software is just the tool. What you need to know is across all software.hardware solutions. Mic technology, engineering basics, etc.
Well, I think you can learn both simultaneously: you'll learn the features of your DAW better and better the more you use it, and you'll learn production and engineering techniques as you're using your DAW. There's plenty of information available to teach you the basics, such as Alan Parson's The Art and Science of Recording series, and Mike Senior's excellent book on mixing, Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio.
 
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