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vintage ES 335 questions II

sharky

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Jan 25, 2012
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Hello vintage ES specialists. I have one to me very urgent questions about a 60s ES-335. If you had an instrument like this in a real good condition, nearly not dinged at all, perfect nitro all over the place but under the blacklight it shows an however changed surface that does not glow under the blacklight at all. From the rear strap pin following the treble side downwards some 20 inches or so. A perfect edge under the pin as done with masking tape and a rather shady/cloudy area on the lower side. As it is on the lower side it can not be that the laquer was rubbed off by a strap, i think it is oversprayed or touched up.

Now, what kind of issue is this to a otherwise more or less perfect vintage ES and how much could this knock off the price?

I'll attache one picture that shows the clear frontier between the glowing and the non glowing portion to illustrate what i mean.

Thank you for any advices in advance

IMG_1958Large.jpg
IMG_1957Large.jpg
 

MikeSlub

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Any refinished surface is an "issue" and would have a significant impact on price. :hank
 

sharky

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Any refinished surface is an "issue" and would have a significant impact on price. :hank

thank you Mike for your opinion. Yeah, i'm sure it does. But could you quantify this on this particular issue? The cherry red was not changed or added newly to the body. If the guitar would be priced let's say 20 k in a perfect condition, what would it knock off the price.

I really can not imagine one reason for this repair job. No cracks or blemishes to be seen. Strange thing
 

garywright

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Aug 17, 2002
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I agree with you sharky ...that's probably overspray, but I'm wondering why ? ...perhaps it was banged/cracked then concealed so well that it's now hard to detect ...on a 20k guitar if this was the only issue I'd probably try a 2-4k price drop ...i'm guessing this is either a '61-62 model ?
 
B

bigsby'd

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Probably clear overspray. Could be covering something; could be nothing. A lot of shops would respray clear just to halt finish checking, or a simple wear spot.
 

MikeSlub

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thank you Mike for your opinion. Yeah, i'm sure it does. But could you quantify this on this particular issue? The cherry red was not changed or added newly to the body. If the guitar would be priced let's say 20 k in a perfect condition, what would it knock off the price.

I really can not imagine one reason for this repair job. No cracks or blemishes to be seen. Strange thing

sharky, it really depends based on what the buyer's goals are - to play and keep forever, or to collect and possibly recoup their investment some day. To the collector, issues are issues and "the longer the tale, the harder the sale". Many would simply pass and would pay more for a no issues guitar. However, if you are buying to play and enjoy as a vintage instrument, then it might not matter as much. All that said, I would deduct at least 25% from the asking price. But that's just my opinion. Others will disagree. :hank
 

585960

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Apr 5, 2002
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there could possibly be a repair that is hard to detect by eye, because sometimes the repair is also painted and airbrushed in, where the black light will not show snot green. I have also seen where an original finish has been buffed out on a wheel, and although still a snot green, wasn't nearly as strong as prior to buffing.....
 

latestarter

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Very hard to tell from those photo's (either that or my eyes have deteriorated a lot over the weekend) but using the standard rule that a refinished example of most things (total refin) cuts the price in half or worse, I would assume a smaller area like this would be in line with MikeSlub's comment.

And right now with the market as it is, these things are having more of an impact. Great for buyers looking for non 100% pieces at decent prices, not so good for sellers who purchased when the market was peaking (and the only way into vintage for many was to buy something that had a little bit of work/overspray/changed parts)
 

OKGuitar

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Jan 20, 2011
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The premium paid for a no issue guitar is considerable-especially when they begin to approach mint. Assuming that it really is a $20,000 guitar (better be a 61-62 dot neck) if it didn't have the overspray, I would call it a $13,000 guitar as is-as long as there is no repair under there. A 61 sold on Ebay recently for just over $16K. Granted, you never know what your getting on Ebay but it was described as "no issue"
 

sharky

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Jan 25, 2012
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thanks for all further opinions, guys, they are as i expected them to be.
 
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