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Why a reverse panel on early Fenders

goldtop0

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Aug 19, 2003
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And the same on early Marshall combos.
So we have Volume , Tone etc facing away from the front of the amp.
Plus the footpedals on blackface Fenders with Reverb/Vibrato facing the other way, why is that?
What were Leo and Jim thinking.
 

gmann

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May 26, 2003
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Always wondered about that myself. It would have been so easy to do it the other way I can’t believe no one suggested it.
 

thin sissy

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Jan 2, 2006
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My guess is that they thought players would place the amps at the front of the stage facing the dance floor. The player would stand behind the amp and then be able to fiddle the knobs. This is not how I would want to be set up, but since this was early in amplified music maybe they didn't know better?

Again, this is only a guess :)
 

J T

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Oct 20, 2005
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Back at the time they were made, the big bands style was that everybody sat and played with music stands in front. The music stands were like little podiums with the logo or initials of the band on the front. Sitting in this arrangement, a seated guitar player would have the amp in front between them and the audience. That is why the panel and knobs face the rear of the amp. That design carried over until players began putting the amps in back of them so that they could stand up and move around the stage.
 

goldtop0

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So the amp panels and footswitches were designed for '40s playing..........ooh err...........rock'n'roll will never die :LOL:
 

Bob Womack

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Apr 8, 2002
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The Epiphone Zephyr was the archetype for this design.

thumbnail.jpg.e993f7ca5d295706a1ea068fd5f4e0fc.jpg


The top was angled back and the front had the snazzy fretwork to make the amp look just like a miniature period stage music stand.

1d74266d1d5cc2199bddfee0d907e99d.jpg


Back in 1975 a high school friend of mine had one of those Zephyrs and I lusted after it its cool Art Deco look.

Bob
 
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Don

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Dec 1, 2001
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We used to play at a place so small that the best spot for my tweed Deluxe was in front of me. It worked well that way.
 
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goldtop0

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And then '50s R'n'R happened and players like Scotty Moore and others who were backing up stood alongside their amps so it wasn't an issue but by the mid '60s with Marshall and Vox combos and band members standing out front it stayed the same........beats me.
 

charliechitlins

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Nov 16, 2021
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George Thorogood once asked Hounddog Taylor why he sat behind his amp.
"Cuz it's too LOUD!" was the answer.
 
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