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How much of an issue is a plywood crack by the output jack?

blauserk

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Mar 12, 2002
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1,778
A friend of mine is interested in a '54 ES-175, but there's a crack in the plywood by the output jack. I know it's not uncommon to get cracks at the output jack, but how can he figure out how much of an issue that will be? Whether it will be stable if he avoids putting pressure on the cable, or whether it will get worse?

Thanks for any guidance you can give.
70b494_eedd587081024923a2a54754f0a8c3a4~mv2.webp
 

poor man's burst

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Oct 3, 2010
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On a '54 ES-175, the sides are solid wood, nor plywood.
A crack at the output jack is quite common. If not already done, it should be repaired by glueing a patch of cross grain veneer inside, to prevent cracking further. If properly addressed, it shouldn't be ignored but, as of me, of minor concern.
Also, using a 90° angled jack diminishes the stress on the side.
 

blauserk

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Thanks! That is very helpful. So a good luthier would be able to put the patch in through I guess the F-hole?
 

GimmeGibson

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May 27, 2021
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So this is interesting to me. I just bought a 2022 ES 335 and I was wondering why the input jack is on the front of the guitar and not the side, where they are on my Les Pauls. I’m trying to understand if it is a durability concern on Gibsons part, or for ease of assembly.
I would have thought mounting it on the side would be better but this seems to not be the case looking at this post.
Any further information as to Gibsons choice of location and the difference from model to model?
 

Grog

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Apr 7, 2012
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It’s likely production considerations in most cases. They can machine all of the holes & “F” holes in one operation.
I have a set of 1974 Les Paul Signatures. You might not be able to see it in this photo but they have two jacks, one on the front & one on the side. Front is high impedance & side is balanced low impedance. So anything goes!

Sgx49bq.jpg
 

GimmeGibson

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It’s likely production considerations in most cases. They can machine all of the holes & “F” holes in one operation.
I have a set of 1974 Les Paul Signatures. You might not be able to see it in this photo but they have two jacks, one on the front & one on the side. Front is high impedance & side is balanced low impedance. So anything goes!

Sgx49bq.jpg
Two? That’s different. Nice guitars by the way. That’s what I need, a matching base.
 

Wilko

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Mar 11, 2002
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Natural (blonde). nice!

Yep. Through the pickup hole. Clamped through the jack hole.

I've got a '76 175. Prolly plywood.
 

GimmeGibson

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May 27, 2021
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Strange. I’m not getting my email notifications to this thread? Everything checks out in my settings.
I “unwatched” and “watched” again so if anyone can post something I can see if that worked.
 

Grog

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Apr 7, 2012
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552
Strange. I’m not getting my email notifications to this thread? Everything checks out in my settings.
I “unwatched” and “watched” again so if anyone can post something I can see if that worked.
I seem to have a matching bass fetish……..
ErIUJwg.jpg


Hope your settings work……..
 

Guitar Whiskey

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Aug 10, 2006
Messages
2,756
On a '54 ES-175, the sides are solid wood, nor plywood.
A crack at the output jack is quite common. If not already done, it should be repaired by glueing a patch of cross grain veneer inside, to prevent cracking further. If properly addressed, it shouldn't be ignored but, as of me, of minor concern.
Also, using a 90° angled jack diminishes the stress on the side.
The ES-175 has a laminated top, back, and sides meaning they are a plywood guitar. Your recommendation on repair is good regardless of the construction.
 

poor man's burst

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Oct 3, 2010
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The ES-175 has a laminated top, back, and sides meaning they are a plywood guitar. Your recommendation on repair is good regardless of the construction.
Having repaired a few during my more than 30 years practice as a luthier, I maintain that ES-175 sides were made of solid wood, at least, those made in the OP guitar's era. Back and tops were plywood. Gibson may have change to plywood sides at a certain time, in which case I would be glad to know when.
 
Last edited:

Guitar Whiskey

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Aug 10, 2006
Messages
2,756
Having repaired a few during my more than 30 years practice as a luthier, I maintain that ES-175 sides were made of solid wood, at least, those made in the OP guitar's era. Back and tops were plywood. Gibson may have change to plywood sides at a certain time, in which case I would be glad to know when.
OK thanks. I now know that.
 
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