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I don't get it....why buy aged guitar???

Gold Tone

Active member
Joined
Apr 2, 2002
Messages
6,791
Aging was the answer to the manufacturing question "What do we do with this finish flawed guitar?"

New production guitars with slight finish imperfections are perfect candidates for aging/relicing.

Think of all the guitars saved from the dreaded '2' stamp or worse the bandsaw! :2cool

This exactly

Genius way for guitar co. to save cost of "2" guitars AND even give it a price hike!
 

J T

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 20, 2005
Messages
10,087
I should have read closer, as the work I watched was not done to new guitars, either at the factory or right after they were built.

But, artificially aging guitars in general has been going on at least as long as I stated.

Yes I was wondering about before they left the factory. Seems it gained popularity in Gibson and Fender when they saw customers grabbing them up.
 

drog1602

New member
Joined
Sep 14, 2015
Messages
98
Why? Because it played great, sounded great and felt comfortable in my hands.

How do you choose guitars?
 

clearmudd

Member
Joined
May 26, 2016
Messages
487
I had read a article a long time ago in a guitar mag that Keef Richards believes he started the fad ( fake ageing ) when Fender presented him a reissue Tele, he loved it but thought it looked too new and wanted it beat-up a bit.

So.... Fender roughed it up to his liking.
 

thunderkyss

Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2002
Messages
743
I honestly think the basic answer, already mentioned, some people like red... some people like a tobacco sunburst. It is what it is.

On a deeper note, I have a theory. Back in the day nit picky sobs used to complain that the finish was wearing off their new guitar. Or the paint was bleeding onto the fretboard, or onto their hands, or some crazy crap like that. Manufacturers started developing finishes that would prevent these issues.

Now, we're getting guitars that won't wear... You might chip or ding a new finish, but it's not going to wear like the vintage instruments will. They won't check (actually, I just pulled out a 2006 bass I had in storage & the top poly coat is falling off in chunks).

So that's why people buy aged guitars. We'd like for them to age naturally, but with today's finishes, it's not going to happen. That worn finish you buy today will look almost the same after 20 years of playing.
 

Karldoog

New member
Joined
Apr 3, 2017
Messages
132
I think that could be a mistaken plan. Maybe try playing it a few hours. THs are different from the other ones. Louder acoustically in my experience twice now. Three times including another guy's guitar. Give it a try.

Writing this because when I got mine I thought it looked a little weird too, but now I literally do not notice it as being anything odd or uncomfortable.

It's already in the mail, going back home. I tried playing it and loving it but it was like an ugly baby---I knew I SHOULD have loved it, and I really tried, but I just couldn't bring meself to look upon its face....:bh

I just scored a nice Traditional Pro, bright and shiny and all cherry-like, and she sings like a beautiful siren... :hee
 

markgohmann

New member
Joined
Mar 13, 2002
Messages
7
I'll admit I only read about 20 posts before I skipped to the end to give my opinion.
I'll tell you why I will only buy an aged guitar ( I have three True Historics and a Fender Heavy Relic)
It is because I can play them all I want and NOT DEVALUE them. Every nick, bump, scratch, rust spot, blemish
etc. etc. etc. that I put on a new $7000 guitar will come back to haunt me down the line when I go to sell it.
The buyer will beat me up for every little tiny imperfection. Every time I bump the guitar into my computer
desk, my sons cymbal etc. etc. it is literally like throwing a couple hundred dollars down the drain. Now people
will say, "well I am never going to sell this guitar" right......Now some of you are saying"That never happens to me
I buy a guitar and then want to sell it down the road to finance another one!".Look in the mirror and say this three times and
see if you really believe that......
Now with an aged guitar every time I bump, scratch, hit, bang drop, sweat on the thing it looks cooler.When I go to sell said guitar
I have my luthier (who happens to be outstanding and can out perform any PLEK machine) level and crown the frets
and I can sell the guitar in "mint" condition! In fact the guitar will go up in value depending on the economy and the
current supply. Right now Gibson isn't shipping any new Custom orders from I have been told....
I can leave my guitars out, not having to worry about humidity or temp messing with the finish. I don't have worry about
forgetting to wipe it down. I don't have to NOT let people with a belt on hold it etc. etc. I can just enjoy having such a nice
instrument.
Also when you get a Murphy Aged guitar it can actually increase the value of your guitar. The aging is so realistic and
time consuming that there is a reason he has such a great reputation. If you haven't seen a Murphy in person you need
to hold judgement until you do.

Opinions??Come on I can take it......
 
Last edited:

markgohmann

New member
Joined
Mar 13, 2002
Messages
7
I'll admit I only read about 20 posts before I skipped to the end to give my opinion.
I'll tell you why I will only buy an aged guitar ( I have three True Historics and a Fender Heavy Relic)
It is because I can play them all I want and NOT DEVALUE them. Every nick, bump, scratch, rust spot, blemish
etc. etc. etc. that I put on the $7000 guitar will come back to haunt me down the line when I go to sell it.
The buyer will beat me up for every little tiny imperfection. Every time I bump the guitar into my computer
desk, my sons cymbal etc. etc. it is literally like throwing a couple hundred dollars down the drain. Now people
will say, "well I am never going to sell this guitar" right......Now some of you are saying"That never happens to me
I buy a guitar and then want to sell it down the road to finance another one!".Look in the mirror and say this three times.
Now with an aged guitar every time I bump, scratch, hit, bang drop, sweat on the thing it looks cooler.When I go to sell said guitar
I have my luthier (who happens to be outstanding and can out perform any PLEK machine) level and crown the frets
and I can sell the guitar in "mint" condition! In fact the guitar will go up in value depending on the economy and the
current supply. Right now Gibson isn't shipping any new Custom orders from I have been told....
Also when you get a Murphy Aged guitar it can actually increase the value of your guitar. The aging is so realistic and
time consuming that there is a reason he has such a great reputation. If you haven't seen a Murphy in person you need
to hold judgement until you do.

Opinions??Come on I can take it......
 

ONEHERO

New member
Joined
Apr 5, 2016
Messages
210
I'll admit I only read about 20 posts before I skipped to the end to give my opinion.
I'll tell you why I will only buy an aged guitar ( I have three True Historics and a Fender Heavy Relic)
It is because I can play them all I want and NOT DEVALUE them. Every nick, bump, scratch, rust spot, blemish
etc. etc. etc. that I put on a new $7000 guitar will come back to haunt me down the line when I go to sell it.
The buyer will beat me up for every little tiny imperfection. Every time I bump the guitar into my computer
desk, my sons cymbal etc. etc. it is literally like throwing a couple hundred dollars down the drain. Now people
will say, "well I am never going to sell this guitar" right......Now some of you are saying"That never happens to me
I buy a guitar and then want to sell it down the road to finance another one!".Look in the mirror and say this three times and
see if you really believe that......
Now with an aged guitar every time I bump, scratch, hit, bang drop, sweat on the thing it looks cooler.When I go to sell said guitar
I have my luthier (who happens to be outstanding and can out perform any PLEK machine) level and crown the frets
and I can sell the guitar in "mint" condition! In fact the guitar will go up in value depending on the economy and the
current supply. Right now Gibson isn't shipping any new Custom orders from I have been told....
I can leave my guitars out, not having to worry about humidity or temp messing with the finish. I don't have worry about
forgetting to wipe it down. I don't have to NOT let people with a belt on hold it etc. etc. I can just enjoy having such a nice
instrument.
Also when you get a Murphy Aged guitar it can actually increase the value of your guitar. The aging is so realistic and
time consuming that there is a reason he has such a great reputation. If you haven't seen a Murphy in person you need
to hold judgement until you do.

Opinions??Come on I can take it......

:hank
 

indravayu

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
398
It's already in the mail, going back home. I tried playing it and loving it but it was like an ugly baby---I knew I SHOULD have loved it, and I really tried, but I just couldn't bring meself to look upon its face....:bh

I just scored a nice Traditional Pro, bright and shiny and all cherry-like, and she sings like a beautiful siren... :hee

You returned an aged True Historic 59 and bought a Trad Pro to replace it? Sounds like it wasn't the aging that turned you off, but rather the price tag! :hee
 

latestarter

Active member
Joined
Nov 9, 2009
Messages
3,997
I find it more interesting when someone posts a photo of a recently acquired small ding in their beloved Les Paul with requests for advice on "what to do". I guess "put it in its case and leave it there" is probably the right answer.

I've not purchased an "aged" guitar, but I can relate to the idea of it.
 

Karldoog

New member
Joined
Apr 3, 2017
Messages
132
You returned an aged True Historic 59 and bought a Trad Pro to replace it? Sounds like it wasn't the aging that turned you off, but rather the price tag! :hee
lol, no actually I bought ANOTHER True Historic '59 R9 and am awaiting it to arrive, hopefully tomorrow. I mean, who the hell owns only ONE Les Paul??? :salude Not this child....(photos coming....)

Funny thing about the Trad Pro though is that it has a barely-perceptible checking already starting on it. I mean, you can juuuuuuuust about make it out in certain angles. But that looks fine. It also doesn't have big bare spots on the sides/back and a "fake history". It looks like what I am starting to understand is "normal" aging for these thin nitro finishes. Honestly, I love the look of it---new, but on its way to acquiring some character.

And don't pooh-pooh the Trad-Pro; I am simply blown away by it's tone and voice. ANd it plays like a stick of buttah. It's an incredible guitar even with the gimmicky controls. They don't bnother me as much as I thought they might. When I get my next LP--a Standard, no doubt--I'll get a real shiny one.:peace2
 

indravayu

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
398
And don't pooh-pooh the Trad-Pro; I am simply blown away by it's tone and voice. ANd it plays like a stick of buttah. It's an incredible guitar even with the gimmicky controls. They don't bnother me as much as I thought they might. When I get my next LP--a Standard, no doubt--I'll get a real shiny one.:peace2

Oh, I'm not pooh-poohing - used to own a Traditional (not a Pro, though), myself, before jumping on the Historic LP train. I think the Traditionals are the best LP that Gibson USA makes.
 

RavenTooth

Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
56
One of the reasons I broke down and bought a custom shop historic les paul was for the nitro finish and nickel hardware, that would actually age naturally! I also upgraded my plastics for the same reasons. After playing a Tokai hard for many years all I had to show for it was some rusty screws. The poly finish and chrome hardware still looks basically brand new.

Only had my Gibson for two years and haven't gigged it much in that time but its already starting to take on a soft, natural patina which really can't be faked. It is like breaking in a pair of raw jeans or a high quality leather jacket.

I have a Rick Kelly telecaster style guitar which I bought used and has some (presumed) fake relic'ing on it. Dulled tuners, a bit of checking and some bumps and bruises. Looks convincing enough that I pretend its real. Bear in mind this is real old style nitro and the checking is not from razor blades. Guitar sounds absolutely amazing.

Creating natural aging on my guitars is one reason I don't want to own too many.
 

Keefoman

Active member
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
460
Creating natural aging on my guitars is one reason I don't want to own too many.

That's the point. In modern days, people can afford and want to have more than two-three guitars, so one won't be able to use the guitars to actually age as they did when the guitars were used day in and day out for years.
 

Sct13

New member
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
568
For me it literally boils down to me not being able to keep ANYTHING "mint" or new....Period...I play my guitars and I play them pretty hard....so VOS and Aged makes perfect sense to me...

And at what these Les Paul's cost....yea it needs to look like I have already played it a few thousand messy gigs....

Case in point...I'm playing bass with some friends and the *new* Fender Jazz I bought six months ago already has two major "down to the wood" dings in it....

but I'm a clutz....so there you go...
 

StSpider

New member
Joined
Aug 24, 2002
Messages
2,146
I used to be "against" relic, but my perspective has changed a bit in the last couple of years. Hear me out if you're interested.

All the guitars I've bought up to a certain point were mint. Either used or brand new, they were always in "as new" condition and I liked it that way. On the instruments I've had for the longest time all the wear and dings are as genuine as can be.

And boy do I remember putting those dings on the guitar. I distinctly remember how the worst offenders happened. It's the guitar's history and kind of cool, but some stupid marks still bug me to this day.

A couple years ago I was gasing BADLY for a tele. I see a friend putting up his MJT partscaster, top quality hardware and all that, lightly aged. It was already like that so I thought "why not"? I could always flip it if I didn't like it and it was cheap. Grabbed and now I am starting to "get" relic a little bit more.

The advantages have already been said by lots of people: you play it with much less stress. If you ding it, you might not even notice it.

If you gig a lot and carry your stuff around quite frequently chances are you will end up appreciating this type of "freedom".

Now, I'm waiting for a guitar to be built for me. The builder offers the guitar "slightly aged" as a default. Also happens to known as one of the very best in the world for guitar finishes, so I have no doubt it will be top notch stuff. I could order it as a "nos" piece, but I think I will go for the default "slightly aged" look.

As I said: it's way less stressful. And you can always add your own "real" aging on top of that.

So these days I'm cool with relic as long as it's discreet. Over the top relic, tho, it still bothers me. I feel like it takes away some identity from the guitar. I've passed on a fantastic sounding tele because it had a "heavy relic black over sonic blue" finish on the body. Yuck. I also hated how a friend's aged Perry burst looked, with the fake wear by the volume pot and all that.

But some checking and small dings? I'm cool with it.
 

renderit

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
10,019
That's the way I am with the 2 I own. An R4 LP HS and a Fender CS Strat. I always thought it was a bit stupid, now I kinda like it.
 
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