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New Gibson Les Paul that was a Factory Error

Scott L

Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2008
Messages
867
OP,


It's a Gibson Factory SNAFU. The model list listed on the inspection card as a 2019 - right there it is proof the guitar was labeled and packed up just after the 4:20 pm break. A full gloss Trad Pro is a Traditional Pro IV - lots of them out there.

Gibson is also not verifying it left the factory with a gloss finish, only stating it should have been satin. You have no proof it went out that way from Gibson. Everyone will assume you had it brought to a gloss finish.

Rare is defined when demand exceeds supply. Obscure in when there is less knowledge about a something then the supply, thus no demand. Demand drives pricing. Your guitar is not rare and no demand for it. Put it up on Ebay with a $1 starting bid on a no reserve auction and you will really find out what it is truly worth.
 

immarkslater

New member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
16
If you believe their 1 in 10 story, then I have some prime real estate in Florida to sell you if you're interested....! 😂😂😂 LP's are production guitars pumped out of their factory by the thousands/week. Their production screw ups would occur on a daily basis, and are certainly not a "rare" occurrence. Just tell them you want $50,000 for it or you're going to go to the press with your story! 🤣🤣🤣🤣
Thanks for your response, but I'm not really asking your opinion. I want to know if any guitars like mine exist. If what you're saying is true and this occurs on a daily basis, it shouldn't take too long for someone to provide another example of one like I did. Again very simple question that has resulted in many replies that have nothing to do with the question I asked. I'll ask again...

1. Can anyone reading this, provide and example of something like I received?

2. After we establish if this is a 1 out of 10 occurrence, or a 1 every day occurrence, does it add any additional value? Obviously if it is a 1 every day occurrence its not rare at all, but if no one can provide any examples of that happening with evidence to backup the claim, then it really is something that doesn't happen too often.
 

immarkslater

New member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
16
OP,


It's a Gibson Factory SNAFU. The model list listed on the inspection card as a 2019 - right there it is proof the guitar was labeled and packed up just after the 4:20 pm break. A full gloss Trad Pro is a Traditional Pro IV - lots of them out there.

Gibson is also not verifying it left the factory with a gloss finish, only stating it should have been satin. You have no proof it went out that way from Gibson. Everyone will assume you had it brought to a gloss finish.

Rare is defined when demand exceeds supply. Obscure in when there is less knowledge about a something then the supply, thus no demand. Demand drives pricing. Your guitar is not rare and no demand for it. Put it up on Ebay with a $1 starting bid on a no reserve auction and you will really find out what it is truly worth.
The date on the inspection card is January 26th, 2021. I'm not sure where you're getting 2019 from. Evidence is provided that the guitar left the factory with a gloss finish in the pictures I provided. For the last few years, Gibson includes a photo of the finished product before they package it up. The guitar is clearly gloss. Again please stop answering questions I didn't ask.
 

El Gringo

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
4,068
List it on E-Bay or CL and see what you get then. I certainly wouldn't equate this to an official Factory Run Limited Edition. It was a production mistake. IMO, at best, it's worth the price of the equivalent "official" gloss version. The crooked tuner/inlay flaw/finish flaw/low pick guard bracket gouging versions weren't worth any more money! 😄
It is not a production mistake as it is a labeling mistake . Put it another way which mistake would you rather have Gibson making a real production flaw in the manufacturing or a simple mislabeling ? Still doesn't amount to a crook full of Boston baked beans .
 

El Gringo

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
4,068
Thanks for your response, but I'm not really asking your opinion. I want to know if any guitars like mine exist. If what you're saying is true and this occurs on a daily basis, it shouldn't take too long for someone to provide another example of one like I did. Again very simple question that has resulted in many replies that have nothing to do with the question I asked. I'll ask again...

1. Can anyone reading this, provide and example of something like I received?

2. After we establish if this is a 1 out of 10 occurrence, or a 1 every day occurrence, does it add any additional value? Obviously if it is a 1 every day occurrence its not rare at all, but if no one can provide any examples of that happening with evidence to backup the claim, then it really is something that doesn't happen too often.
Wouldn't it make much more sense to ask the manufacturer -Gibson ? I do know that you did and Gibson told you 10 ? Right . So there is your answer and mystery solved . Now why don't you play and enjoy your fine Gibson and then report back your findings and review with some images as well . That's what I would like to know please ?
 

immarkslater

New member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
16
Wouldn't it make much more sense to ask the manufacturer -Gibson ? I do know that you did and Gibson told you 10 ? Right . So there is your answer and mystery solved . Now why don't you play and enjoy your fine Gibson and then report back your findings and review with some images as well . That's what I would like to know please ?
It is a great guitar, I've been playing it a lot since I got it. I've owned many Gibson guitars over the years but this is the first with a compound radius fretboard. It feels amazing, and sounds great. I did post pictures of the guitar in post #30. My question to everyone though about whether or not there are more out there there like this, is really just to validate or disprove what Gibson told me. Through the 2010's Gibson pumped out a lot of guitars that were not so good. A few years ago I purchased a Gibson Les Paul Classic, and it wasn't until the 3rd one arrived that I got one that didn't have some kind of major manufacturing flaw. This newest one I got though isn't like that. Gibson did a really good job with it to the point that I can't find a flaw in it. Only thing is, its the wrong finish. I wouldn't call it a mislabeling because they don't make a traditional pro 5 with a gloss finish in this color. I just took a quick look on Gibson's website, and the only guitars I saw they even offer with this finish is the 58 an 59 Les Paul Standard Reissue.
 

jrgtr42

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2005
Messages
1,972
Going back to the original post since it seems we have gotten way off track. In my original post after the back story for how I got the guitar, and explaining that Gibson has confirmed it should not have left the factory that way; I ask two questions:

1. Gibson claims this is rare, Is it rare? Can anyone provide evidence of another one leaving the factory with the wrong finish?

I'm not talking about poor craftsmanship, I'm looking for things like the guitar I ordered is supposed to be red, but for some reason its green. I called Gibson and they confirmed it's supposed to be red and have no idea how a guitar that is supposed to be red, but was green made it out of the factory.

2. Once we establish whether or not this is as rare as Gibson claims, does it add any value?


Please do not try to convince me that it is supposed to be gloss, or that it is a satin finish that has been polished. Gibson has already confirmed the it has the wrong finish.
If Gibson claims it's rare, then it probably is. I doubt that 1 of 10 number, but something like this probably isn't unheard of.
Its supposed to be a satic faded iced tea burst, obviously it;s not satin, and it doesn't look like iced tea, either. More like bourbon burst, I think.
But it doesn't add any extra value to the guitar. |I| would say keep it, play it, enjoy it, but I would print out and keep the correspondence from Gibson - if you do go to sell it later on, someone might try to claim it's a refinish and beat you down on price.
 
Last edited:

El Gringo

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
4,068
It is a great guitar, I've been playing it a lot since I got it. I've owned many Gibson guitars over the years but this is the first with a compound radius fretboard. It feels amazing, and sounds great. I did post pictures of the guitar in post #30. My question to everyone though about whether or not there are more out there there like this, is really just to validate or disprove what Gibson told me. Through the 2010's Gibson pumped out a lot of guitars that were not so good. A few years ago I purchased a Gibson Les Paul Classic, and it wasn't until the 3rd one arrived that I got one that didn't have some kind of major manufacturing flaw. This newest one I got though isn't like that. Gibson did a really good job with it to the point that I can't find a flaw in it. Only thing is, its the wrong finish. I wouldn't call it a mislabeling because they don't make a traditional pro 5 with a gloss finish in this color. I just took a quick look on Gibson's website, and the only guitars I saw they even offer with this finish is the 58 an 59 Les Paul Standard Reissue.
Tell me more about the compound radius fret board please ? Is it like a C profile ? Kind of like a 59 neck ? Not to big , or is it more like the slim taper 60 ? I am glad you are enjoying your new Les Paul , as that's what it is all about !
 

SDMFVan

New member
Joined
Sep 13, 2018
Messages
16
You should probably treat the "1 of 10" factoid as what it is: anecdotal evidence based on one employee's personal experience. It's not an official stat provided by Gibson.
 

Scott L

Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2008
Messages
867
The date on the inspection card is January 26th, 2021. I'm not sure where you're getting 2019 from. Evidence is provided that the guitar left the factory with a gloss finish in the pictures I provided. For the last few years, Gibson includes a photo of the finished product before they package it up. The guitar is clearly gloss. Again please stop answering questions I didn't ask.

The 19 in the model number.
 
Last edited:

immarkslater

New member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
16
The 19 in the model number.
Serial number is: 201310036

From Gibson:

Gibson USA 2014 to present – These serial numbers cannot be dated to a specific day of the year.
The new model year typically launches in the fall as the current model year winds down. It is not uncommon for a new model year model to be produced during the previous model year (example – a 2015 model may have been built in late 2014).

The pattern is as follows:
YYRRRRRRR
YY is the model year
RRRRRRR is the number in product for the model year (starts at 0000001)



Looks like it got its serial number in late 2020
 

Scott L

Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2008
Messages
867
MODEL not serial #

index.php
 

immarkslater

New member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
16
MODEL not serial #

index.php
Sorry, it looks like you edited your post (see the attached image) after I replied to you . When I replied you said "The 19 in the serial number." Which is why I was confused. Anyway the 19 in the model number doesn't date the guitar. Its the model number for a Traditional Pro V in Satin Iced Tea Burst. They probably just designed it in 2019. Based off the date on the inspection card and the serial number on the guitar, looks licame off the line in early 2021.

lp post.JPG
 

Scott L

Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2008
Messages
867
I did correct the post. The 19 is the year indicator in the model number. The model was introduced in 2019
Note the date when put the on the Guitar Center floor.

Some how your guitar got polished more than it was supposed to as satin model. Simply more time on a buffing wheel.
Many people have done the same at home on other satin guitars by hand.


tp519.png
 

El Gringo

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
4,068
It is a great guitar, I've been playing it a lot since I got it. I've owned many Gibson guitars over the years but this is the first with a compound radius fretboard. It feels amazing, and sounds great. I did post pictures of the guitar in post #30. My question to everyone though about whether or not there are more out there there like this, is really just to validate or disprove what Gibson told me. Through the 2010's Gibson pumped out a lot of guitars that were not so good. A few years ago I purchased a Gibson Les Paul Classic, and it wasn't until the 3rd one arrived that I got one that didn't have some kind of major manufacturing flaw. This newest one I got though isn't like that. Gibson did a really good job with it to the point that I can't find a flaw in it. Only thing is, its the wrong finish. I wouldn't call it a mislabeling because they don't make a traditional pro 5 with a gloss finish in this color. I just took a quick look on Gibson's website, and the only guitars I saw they even offer with this finish is the 58 an 59 Les Paul Standard Reissue.
I am glad you are happy and enjoying your new Les Paul ☀️
 

talonmm

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2015
Messages
179
So if Gibson makes a limited run of say 50 guitars, they're valuable because there will only ever be 50 of them in existence. Something that is 1 of maybe 10, and should not exist has no real added value? Seems like it should be worth more than the $1899 the satin version retails for simply because of the added cost to produce a guitar with a gloss finish. I find it hard to believe that it doesn't add any value.
Put it on reverb or ebay, or list it here at the price you feel (or believe) it's worth.

And when you don't get any responses or offers, you will have your answer.
 

Sérgio

Active member
Joined
Dec 10, 2014
Messages
647
If I were you I’d be very happy.

Faded and satin finishes are one of Gibson’s ways of cutting costs, although they do advertise them as though they were supposed to create a “played in” feel (which they don’t. Hold a well played vintage guitar and the difference is obvious).

If I bought a satin finished LP and got a glossy full nitro sprayed one, I’d definitely consider it a lucky event.

On the other hand, I doubt anyone would deem it collectible or more valuable because of the factory mistake.

YMMV
 
Joined
Jan 11, 2020
Messages
114
No one can answer if it will increase the value in the future. All anyone can say is that they would or would not potentially pay more for it. Personally, I would not pay a penny more for it being a "mistake guitar" but I also would not demand less. You have a fairly common guitar in an uncommon finish for that guitar. If you love it and it brings you joy then you have a gem. I cannot imagine that it is gong to bring you any more in the future than if it had left Gibson with the correct finish--but if you put it up for auction and 2 people both want it, anything can happen and it could bring (slightly) more--but I would not predict that. Seems like you are happy with it, so play it and enjoy it but you probably will not realize much increase over any other same year, same model guitar.
 
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