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Replacement NAMM '67 Flying V has arrived... not good news

Icandrive55

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2019
Messages
67
Hi GreenBurst, I actually returned the guitars directly. I'm in California and the dealer is in The Netherlands. That might be the cause of some of the confusion. I hadn't received any confirmation about receipt of the guitars and neither did the dealer. I asked them.

I have been leaving it up to the dealer to handle all communications. I just check with them from time to time for updates and he's been very straightforward and helpful. The issue now is that someone at Gibson instructed him to have me return the 2nd guitar so they could build another one. And then when the dealer recently checked back in, he's being asked if he's given me a refund yet. So something clearly went very wrong. I'm just waiting to see what happens at this point and hoping for the best.

I do regret losing my cool with Gibson. While I wasn't happy with the way they handled the claim, I don't think it did any good to get super frustrated with them. I think it's been a sh*t year for a lot of people and everyone is stressed out.
 

wmachine

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2016
Messages
245
Hindsight is 20/20. and I'm a card carrying Monday morning quartertback, but why on earth would someone in California use a dealer in the Netherlands? I can almost understand that the other way around, but not this way. With something this far up the importance chain, and being something literally custom, I would think an in-person connection would be nearly mandatory, This "world economy" lacks in many areas that cannot compensated for. And this looks like one to me. Not meant to criticize, Icandrive55,
and I hope for a good outcome for you. But more like food for thought for others wanting to do the same. "Plan for problems".
 

El Gringo

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
4,240
Hey El Gringo, no apologies necessary. I'm fairly certain the dealer doesn't know anything that I don't. He was under the impression they were building a 3rd guitar and he was planning on purchasing the 2 original guitars for his store. Gibson is wanting to know now if they gave me a refund. I would rather they not build another guitar at this point and just want my guitar back. No one can instruct you to send your guitar in for a replacement and then keep it. As big as Gibson is, it's irrelevant. Maybe it was just a miscommunication but it's very serious. You can't return a car to a dealership to fix a bad transmission, and then the dealership decides to keep the car and forces you to take cash. That's not an option at their disposal. Like I said, I hope this has just been a bad miscommunication and I can have one of the original guitars returned to me and be over with it. That way, Gibson doesn't have to deal with building me another guitar, I still get close to what I originally wanted, and Max Guitar gets to have a guitar as well.
Greetings, It has been a while since you sent the 2 guitars back ? So in that time I wonder what could have been done with the first 2 Flying V's ? That is where it can get tricky/dicey because did Gibson Custom re sell the guitars or did they wood chipper them ? Best case they have them sitting somewhere and then you can get one back . The Pandemic has thrown everything out of wack .
 

Icandrive55

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2019
Messages
67
Hindsight is 20/20. and I'm a card carrying Monday morning quartertback, but why on earth would someone in California use a dealer in the Netherlands? I can almost understand that the other way around, but not this way. With something this far up the importance chain, and being something literally custom, I would think an in-person connection would be nearly mandatory, This "world economy" lacks in many areas that cannot compensated for. And this looks like one to me. Not meant to criticize, Icandrive55,
and I hope for a good outcome for you. But more like food for thought for others wanting to do the same. "Plan for problems".
Well... this was a very unique case. I wanted this specific guitar before I had any idea it went to a shop in The Netherlands. It was a one-off guitar that I was fairly obsessed with (still am) so it was either I bought it from that store or I wouldn't have it. It wouldn't even cross my mind otherwise to order a guitar overseas. But yes, when buying a rare instrument overseas, pretty much consider the fact that you have to accept whatever you receive before buying it. There is no visiting the store and getting anything sorted out easily.

El Gringo, that is my concern as well with the time that has passed since the other 2 guitars were sent back. No one knows the status of those 2 guitars. The dealer did mention early on that he wanted them back for his store so there is some hope that Gibson set them aside. We shall see.
 

Icandrive55

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2019
Messages
67

So... some pretty wild news! I got the original NAMM guitar back! I didn't want to say anything too soon because I wasn't sure what Gibson was planning on doing. They ended up replacing the fretboard on it and did an incredible job. The fretboard itself is extremely nice and dark. No flaws at all. The fret job is also phenomenal. It plays like a completely different guitar now. Super buttery and easy to play. I really can't believe it.

This one is definitely going with me into the grave!
 

jrgtr42

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2005
Messages
2,003
Great to hear that it worked out.
This is pretty much the best option that could have happenned - same guitar, but replace that fretboard.
Obviously you've gone over it with a fine-tooth comb before posting it.
 

Icandrive55

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2019
Messages
67
Thank you. Yes, it is the best outcome I could have hoped for. I never wanted to give up the original guitar.

Correction: upon closer inspection of the wood grain, it actually looks like they repaired the existing fretboard. They must have sanded it down, polished the frets, and then removed the buffing compound from under the lacquer. Impressive how much difference sanding it down made.
 
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El Gringo

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
4,240
I am so happy to hear that Gibson fixed the instrument and that it meets with your approval and that you are happy . Best Wishes and now Rock out ☀️
 

Icandrive55

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2019
Messages
67
too bad they didn't to the easy fix the first time around. Glad it worked out. cool guitar and a Story!!!🤘🤘🤘
Thanks Zack! Yes... the irony is that they ended up doing what I suggested doing in the first place. It's definitely quite a story and miraculous I got the guitar back. There are a lot of details of this situation I am leaving out that jeopardized the possibility of getting it back.

But for anyone reading, I think there is a more important takeaway here. Be damn sure you are willing to take a risk when returning a guitar for repair/replacement that you really like. I almost lost a guitar that I would have never been able to reproduce.
 

surfreak

Active member
Joined
May 6, 2002
Messages
1,111
I am glad Gibson did come with a workaround that you are happy with.

As an external observer with no vested interest but a lot of sympathy for how fairly you have managed this issue, I must say though that I would have preferred a full fingerboard replacement rather than a splice job on the existing one, expertly done as it might be.
 

Icandrive55

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2019
Messages
67
I am glad Gibson did come with a workaround that you are happy with.

As an external observer with no vested interest but a lot of sympathy for how fairly you have managed this issue, I must say though that I would have preferred a full fingerboard replacement rather than a splice job on the existing one, expertly done as it might be.
I think there would be serious risk damaging the paint in order to do that. I believe they looked at it and came up with the best solution they could with the lowest risk. I'm just glad to have the original guitar back because I don't think it can be reproduced. The paint job is something you have to see in person. Completely changes color in different lighting. They layered different colors to achieve that with a tinted clear coat, and still managed to have an incredibly thin finish. There's no clear coat buildup anywhere.

My issue now is whether or not to remove the NAMM sticker on the back of the headstock. I think I probably will so it doesn't ruin the finish. Just afraid to take it off since it's been on now for quite a long time.
 

El Gringo

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Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
4,240
I think there would be serious risk damaging the paint in order to do that. I believe they looked at it and came up with the best solution they could with the lowest risk. I'm just glad to have the original guitar back because I don't think it can be reproduced. The paint job is something you have to see in person. Completely changes color in different lighting. They layered different colors to achieve that with a tinted clear coat, and still managed to have an incredibly thin finish. There's no clear coat buildup anywhere.

My issue now is whether or not to remove the NAMM sticker on the back of the headstock. I think I probably will so it doesn't ruin the finish. Just afraid to take it off since it's been on now for quite a long time.
Sticky stickers on a guitar are a chore for sure to remove first , then to get the adhesive stuff off .
 
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