• Guys, we've spent considerable money converting the Les Paul Forum to this new XenForo platform, and we have ongoing monthly operating expenses. THE "DONATIONS" TAB IS NOW WORKING, AND WE WOULD APPRECIATE ANY DONATIONS YOU CAN MAKE TO KEEP THE LES PAUL FORUM GOING! Thank you!

Your 1'st choice TOM bridge replacement for your historic

Sol

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2001
Messages
775
Thanks for your replies guys
The sound files on the ABM site comparing their range of ABR-1 style bridges against an original was a bit of an eye opener.
Of the three metals the brass was my favourite overall, and now I've got a lot to think about... A Faber or a Pigtail for example keeps me in historic tradition and I assume tone, even if that tone lacks the breadth and depth of the ABM..

This is turning into a far more interesting and thought provoking thread than I expected , very cool . If you've
found an ABR-1 not yet covered jump in, as a list of high quality options for those that want to try alternatives to Gibson's ABR-1 might be useful to others.

This, by the way is NOT a bash against Gibson by any means , and your supportive defence is very welcome, so if you think I'm daft looking elsewhere..
 

Sol

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2001
Messages
775
I've bumped this thread, regarding ABR-1 bridge options because of the fantastic response to my post regarding my quest for my first ES 335 / 345 Gibson.

Two forum members suggested I take a close look at the semi acoustic Collings guitars based closely on Gibsons
ES 335.
Collings flat top acoustic guitars are in many ways a 'bench mark' of traditional American excellence. Obsessive attention to detail, and materials have garnered them an international following.

With this in mind I was intrigued to learn that Collings are using Kluson ABR-1 bridges.. Now, a company that will pass on certain types of figured maple due to undesirable artifacts in the treble response, and yet with every option open to them, choose the Kluson ABR-1 over all other options.

Cost cutting could be a factor, but this isn't consistent with the product. I'm really intrigued by this one... What do you think ?
 

Jared Purdy

New member
Joined
Feb 11, 2011
Messages
134
So many options available to players, please share your journey to the finest tune o matic bridge in design and tone to the originals.
Thanks guys

As one other poster implied, there's nothing wrong with the stock Historic parts. Hell, Gibson has gone out of their way to listen to the consumer in this regard, and they are to spec, apparently. However, for purely convenience sake, the first R9 that I bought, which was in 2013, I replaced them (bridge and saddle) with Tone Pro because Tone Pro is as good, or better, and they lock with allen key screws so no worry about anything moving. You can take all of the strings off to clean it without having to worry about anything moving. I'm currently debating whether or not to replace the stock bridge and tail piece on my 2019 R9.
 

C-4

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
1,776
Two weeks ago, I bought a 60th Anny R9.
It set up with my string gauge, intonated perfectly, and I never needed to adjust the truss rod.
Due to having radial nerve loss in my left forearm, my string gauge had to go from 10-46 to 7-30, and I have the action as far down on the guitar as it will go.

The action now is measured at 1/32nd at the 22nd fret on the high E, and just a hair more on the bass side.

The bridge sits really low on the guitar and the entire string setup from nut to bridge is in beautiful alignment.

The guitar acoustically sounds louder then my other 2018 M2M R9 set up the same way.

The only parts I bought are for Faber parts for the stop tail posts, and the post inserts as I don't keep my stop tail flush to the body. I haven't changed these parts out yet, and the guitar does everything correctly, so I'm hesitant at this point to start swapping out any parts.
 

AA00475Bassman

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 26, 2016
Messages
3,770
Yesterday I played one of my 2007 R8's even with the wrong glue , wrong truss rod , wrong plastics , wrong pickups , wrong dye , wrong top carve , wrong TOM bridge with a wire I'm still amazed at how such a under spec'ed guitar can sound & play so good I love these 13 year old & older Historic as much as my later ones !

Disclaimer : Being a hack my wallet will not enhance my sound sorry to say !
 

KR1

Active member
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
Messages
266
Yesterday I played one of my 2007 R8's even with the wrong glue , wrong truss rod , wrong plastics , wrong pickups , wrong dye , wrong top carve , wrong TOM bridge with a wire I'm still amazed at how such a under spec'ed guitar can sound & play so good I love these 13 year old & older Historic as much as my later ones !

Well, you're not quite as wrong as I'm wrong because my 2009 R8 has all of your wrong stuff plus it's got a double-carved top which makes it entirely wrong. It's stock and it's all wrong.

Don't tell anyone, but it sounds -killer-
 

Sol

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2001
Messages
775
As one other poster implied, there's nothing wrong with the stock Historic parts. Hell, Gibson has gone out of their way to listen to the consumer in this regard, and they are to spec, apparently. However, for purely convenience sake, the first R9 that I bought, which was in 2013, I replaced them (bridge and saddle) with Tone Pro because Tone Pro is as good, or better, and they lock with allen key screws so no worry about anything moving. You can take all of the strings off to clean it without having to worry about anything moving. I'm currently debating whether or not to replace the stock bridge and tail piece on my 2019 R9.

Great to hear from you. If you're considering the switch to Tone Pro's on your 2019 R9, are you still evaluating the benefits of having done so on your 2013 R9 ?
 

Sol

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2001
Messages
775
Yesterday I played one of my 2007 R8's even with the wrong glue , wrong truss rod , wrong plastics , wrong pickups , wrong dye , wrong top carve , wrong TOM bridge with a wire I'm still amazed at how such a under spec'ed guitar can sound & play so good I love these 13 year old & older Historic as much as my later ones !

Disclaimer : Being a hack my wallet will not enhance my sound sorry to say !

I share your sentiment entirely, my 2004 R7 (a relic of the dark ages, a social embarrassment not to be mentioned in polite company) Is, despite the stigma the finest Les Paul I've played.. What are we to do..?

To KR1, AA00475Bassman and others, I really believe that good humour and a sense of perspective will always prevail, and keep our feet on the ground.
 

Guitardon

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2002
Messages
2,134
I switched to Callaham ABR bridge partially due to the fact that the saddles/screws were always a loose fit in the Gibson bridge, casting tolerances are very loose in comparison to a machined bridge (well at least the Gibson bridges) I got tired of picking the saddles up off the floor every time I was working on the guitar
My original 58 that I owned in the 70s had loosefitting saddles. In fact I was on a gig one night and a string popped and the saddle fell through the crack in the stage floor and I couldn’t retrieve it. So I don’t think the new ones are any worse than the original 50’s models. I’m sure some of the regulars here that own original Les Pauls might challenge this I’m just sharing my experience on an original 58. I ended up buying a couple of them back then and keeping them in my case.
 

Jimi's LP

New member
Joined
Nov 28, 2023
Messages
10
BTW, I did use the Faber until I found the ABM.

All my guitar that have a Tune-O-matic have the ABM bridge: https://abm-guitarpartsshop.com/ABM...0-RE/Bell-Brass/ABM-2500n-RE-Nickel::153.html
I use the Bell Brass bridge! It is a major improvement in every aspect; better sustain, better harmonics, even response..etc, et
I know it's a old subject.
I put on a abm bell brass abr-1 on my 1998 Gibson R9 yesterday with the brass thumbwheels and screw post and with a abm aluminum tailpiece. Acoustically the callaham abr-1 and tailpiece was louder and brighter than the abm. But plug in I really enjoy the abm stuff better. Did you had to switch a saddle around to intonate on yours? If you did was it hard to do?
 
Last edited:
Top